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48001-m
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Katsushika Hokusai
Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji

The Great Wave off Kanagawa

As low as ¥32,780

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You can also buy at Amazon

You can also buy at Amazon

Contents

M sizeL size
Fabric Outer Sizes (mm) aboutH260×W340 aboutH350×W470
Frame Ourter Sizes (mm) aboutH308×W399×D26 aboutH414×W529×D26
Matte Paper Inner Sizes (mm) aboutH177×W257 aboutH262×W381
Weight (g) about810 about1360
  • Technique : Woven Jacquard
  • Frame Material : Wood
  • Matte Paper Material : Paper
  • Front Panel : Acrylic Board
  • Accessories :Hang String, Fabric Bag, Telescopic Box

The billowing waves ravage wildly as the crew of the boat are helpless against the ferocity of nature while Mount Fuji sits placidly in the background. Those who view this print are enveloped with the sensation of being adrift at sea, catching occasional glimpses of Mount Fuji in the moments between the swelling of great waves. With its noticeable contrast between dynamic and static, distance and proximity, this piece was highly acclaimed by Gogh and was an inspiration for Claude Debussey's orchestral piece, The Sea, in addition to being known as an influential piece for other artists.

*Kanagawa Bay (Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa and Kisarazu City, Chiba)
…Lying before Edo, the sprawling Edo Bay (Tokyo Bay) was traversed by many fishing boats and other vessels. From the Middle Ages, ports existed in Shinagawa, Kanagawa, and Mutsuura amongst others. The fleet of three vessels pictured was known as an "Oshiokuri." It would have been used to transport marine products from the Boso Peninsula to Edo. It is said that this view of Mount Fuji could be seen if the boats were travelling from west to east, offshore of the coast of Kisarazu on the opposite side of Kanagawa.

Explanatory Notes are English translation by Hakuba Photo Industry Co., Ltd.
Original notes in Japanesefrom Kaiseum by courtesy of Yamanashi Prefectual Museum.

What is "ORI"?

織りイメージ1

“ORI (Woven Fabrics)” is any textiles formed by weaving a warp and a weft. When expressing complicated patters and pictures on a woven fabric, printing that uses a silk screen that makes low-cost mass production possible is employed in many cases. But the products supplied by ORI TOKYO are made by the use of the Jacquard loom. With the Jacquard loom, textiles are weaved in a complicated way using many colored threads.

The Jacquard loom is an automatic loom invented by a French inventor, Joseph Marie Jacquad. With this loom, a needle that moves upward and downward according to whether or not there are perforations made in a card board and a shaft that moves the warp act inter-connectedly. The warp alone is raised up according to the instructions as shown by the perforations and passed through the weft so that a pattern will be weaved as designed in the card. In modern days, the Jaquard loom has become an electronic Jaquaard loom, with the card board having been replaced with a computer acting as a controller.

織りイメージ1

The Jacquard loom is an automatic loom invented by a French inventor, Joseph Marie Jacquad. With this loom, a needle that moves upward and downward according to whether or not there are perforations made in a card board and a shaft that moves the warp act inter-connectedly. The warp alone is raised up according to the instructions as shown by the perforations and passed through the weft so that a pattern will be weaved as designed in the card. In modern days, the Jaquard loom has become an electronic Jaquaard loom, with the card board having been replaced with a computer acting as a controller.

織りイメージ1

The Jacquard loom is now available in various types, such as the shuttle type and the air jet type. But this product is a type that uses a rapier loom for the weaving purpose. The rapier loom is a component that is called a rapier in the shape of a rod that weaves a thread by repeating weft insertion operations by grabbing the weft and passing it between the warp. In comparison with latest high-speed looms, the rapier loom is capable of weaving a textile retaining a texture, while allowing the weaving width to be set freely and making a large number of colored threads usable on the loom, compared with the shuttle type.

葛飾北斎

Who was Katsushika Hokusai?

Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) was an ukiyo-e painter who born in Edo (now Tokyo) on September 23, 1760 (Horai 10th) and lived in the middle to late Edo period (1603 – 1868).
He studied under the guidance of Katsukawa Shunsho, named himself Katsukawa Shunro, and published pictures of actors. Afterwards, he adopted the artistic styles of the Kano school, the Sumiyoshi school and western-style copperplate engraving. In his late thirties, he established his own artistic style and called himself Hokusai for the first time in 1797.

Hokusai, among many ukiyo-e painters, was a painter who represented an ukiyo-e painter having established himself as the first-class artist in many fields, while having changing his painting style in various ways during this seventy-plus-year artistic life, or the longest life among the ukiyo-e painters.
It is said that Hokusai had great influence over not only Japanese artists but also the European post-impressionists. He is internationally recognized today.

The scope of his paintings is broad, ranging from landscapes, flowers and birds, beautiful women, and caricatures. He left excellent works over a wide range of fields, such as colored woodblock prints, books printed woodblocks, and pictures painted by hand.
Although he was highly rated as an artist, he also seemed a little eccentric in his lifestyle, moving house 93 times in his whole life. He died on May 10, 1849 (Kaei 2nd) at the age of 90. His representative works include “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” and “Collection of Sketches” (Hokusai Manga).

The Hokusai’s woodblock prints, “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji”, that ORI TOKYO presents now are his representative works that are still loved all over the world.

Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) was an ukiyo-e painter who born in Edo (now Tokyo) on September 23, 1760 (Horai 10th) and lived in the middle to late Edo period (1603 – 1868).
He studied under the guidance of Katsukawa Shunsho, named himself Katsukawa Shunro, and published pictures of actors. Afterwards, he adopted the artistic styles of the Kano school, the Sumiyoshi school and western-style copperplate engraving. In his late thirties, he established his own artistic style and called himself Hokusai for the first time in 1797.

Hokusai, among many ukiyo-e painters, was a painter who represented an ukiyo-e painter having established himself as the first-class artist in many fields, while having changing his painting style in various ways during this seventy-plus-year artistic life, or the longest life among the ukiyo-e painters.
It is said that Hokusai had great influence over not only Japanese artists but also the European post-impressionists. He is internationally recognized today.

The scope of his paintings is broad, ranging from landscapes, flowers and birds, beautiful women, and caricatures. He left excellent works over a wide range of fields, such as colored woodblock prints, books printed woodblocks, and pictures painted by hand.
Although he was highly rated as an artist, he also seemed a little eccentric in his lifestyle, moving house 93 times in his whole life. He died on May 10, 1849 (Kaei 2nd) at the age of 90. His representative works include “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” and “Collection of Sketches” (Hokusai Manga).

The Hokusai’s woodblock prints, “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji”, that ORI TOKYO presents now are his representative works that are still loved all over the world.

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